Caring for Your Historic Home

Caring for Your Historic Home

Caring for Your Historic Home

  • Consult with licensed electrical, plumbing and heating specialists for an initial evaluation
    • Arrange schedules for routine maintenance
  • To prevent pipes from freezing in the winter
    • Insulate pipes directly
    • Shut off exterior faucets
    • Maintain a comfortable heating temperature at all times
    • Installation of low temperature sensors & water leak detectors can help alert you to a potential problem
    • If you will be away for an extended period of time, shut off your main water supply
  • Repairing or re-pointing of mortar walls and chimneys may become necessary when any of the following conditions are noted:
    • Cracked or missing mortar
    • Loose bricks or stones,
  • Damp walls or damaged plaster work
  • Regular chimney evaluation and cleaning by a professional
  • Missing, worn or broken roofing materials may allow water to penetrate and deteriorate the roof structure
    • Inspect your roof and flashing around chimneys and skylights periodically, especially after severe storms
    • Contact a licensed roofer for further evaluation and repairs
  • Clear gutters and downspouts of leaves and debris
    • Downspouts should be directed away from the house to improve drainage around the foundation
  • Proper ventilation and updated insulation in the attic can not only reduce the potential for damage or deterioration due to excess moisture, but also reduce energy usage
  • Inspect windows and exterior doors for proper caulking and weather stripping
    • Check exterior paint and siding for peeling and/or cracking
  • Regularly inspect decks, terraces and balconies
  • Periodically inspect foundation walls and floors for cracking that might allow water seepage
  • Avoid storing valuables in the basement.
    • If your basement is prone to leaks or flooding, a sump pump is the best defense
    • A battery back-up is recommended to ensure proper operation during power outages

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